Scientists discover beer bottle at the deepest point of the ocean

While you might expect to find gargantuan squids, Kaijus or the Kraken at the bottom of the ocean, one scientist shared her bizarre find.

In 2022, Dr Dawn Wright, a professor of geography and oceanography at Oregon State University, said humans are ‘irrevocably’ changing the planet.

When it comes to exploring the deep sea, unless you suffer from thalassophobia (the fear of large bodies of water), it can be quite fascinating.

But Dr Wright’s strange discovery proved we needed to understand our planet better to preserve it.

In a Los Angeles Times report, she explained the initial goal of her underwater research was to explore ‘a previously unvisited area’ of the Challenger Deep in the Mariana Trench.

The initial goal of the underwater research was to explore 'a previously unvisited area' of the Challenger Deep. Credit: Getty Stock Image
The initial goal of the underwater research was to explore ‘a previously unvisited area’ of the Challenger Deep. Credit: Getty Stock Image

She descended more than 6.7 miles in a two-seat submarine to the bottom of the Pacific Ocean where she found something peculiar.

“Sitting in sediment at the bottom of the ocean at the Earth’s deepest point: a beer bottle. It had traveled more than 6.7 miles to the darkest depths of the Pacific, label still intact,” Dr Wright explained.

“This discarded trash had managed to reach an unsullied part of our world before we actually did – a symbol of how deeply and irrevocably humans are affecting the natural world.”

Taking to X, she also reinforced her belief that we need to protect the planet better.

“Further evidence that we MUST as humanity do BETTER by the ocean and for the health of habitats that we ourselves share & ultimately depend on,” Dr Wright wrote.

The beer bottle was found at the deepest point of the ocean. Credit: Caladan Oceanic
The beer bottle was found at the deepest point of the ocean. Credit: Caladan Oceanic

The story has recently resurfaced on other social media sites, with users on Reddit remarking how unbelievable it was to find litter in the ocean’s depths.

“Yeah other people are thinking ‘scary’ or ‘eerie’ and I’m thinking ‘depressing’,” one wrote.

“That’s actually kinda depressing. Finding litter even in the furthest depths of the ocean smh,” another added.

While someone else commented: „You know if this isn’t sorta the most depressing and realistic imagine we have seen.

„‘Wonder what new discoveries such depths hold? Trash’.”

And a final user penned: “On the one hand, one can’t help but imagine the sequence of events that happened in order for a glass bottle to go from the surface to literally the deepest point on Earth it’s possible to reach.

„One the other, man it’s depressing that the darkest depths of the ocean – the last vestige of the planet – has been touched by the hand of human pollution.”

Topics: NewsScienceWorld NewsEnvironment

Gerrard Kaonga

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Scientists discover deepest-ever fish at 8,300 meters

Amelia Jones

Published 12:23, 09 April 2023 BST
| Last updated 12:23, 09 April 2023 BSTScientists discover deepest-ever fish at 8,300 meters

Featured Image Credit: University of Western Australia

Scientists have captured footage of the deepest fish ever filmed on the seabed off the coast of Japan.

You can watch the breathtaking footage below:

The young snailfish – an unknown species of the genus Pseudoliparis – was ready for its close up in the abyss of the northern Pacific Ocean, cruising at a depth of 8,336 meters (over 27,000 feet) just above the seabed.

Scientists from University of Western Australia and Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology released footage of the snailfish on Monday (3 April) that was filmed last September by sea robots in the ocean’s deep trenches.

Not satisfied with setting only one record, along with filming the deepest fish, the scientists physically caught two other specimens – of the species Pseudoliparis belyaevi – at 8,022 meters, setting another record for the deepest ever catch.

Scientists have discovered the world's deepest fish. Credit: University of Western Australia
Scientists have discovered the world’s deepest fish. Credit: University of Western Australia

Before the new record was set, the deepest snailfish ever spotted was at 7,703 meters (25,272 feet) in 2008, with scientists previously unable to collect fish from any depth greater than 8k meters.

Marine biologist Alan Jamieson, founder of the Minderoo-UWA Deep Sea Research Centre who headed up the expedition, said: “What is significant is that it shows how far a particular type of fish will descend in the ocean.”

The filming in the trenches off Japan is part of a 10-year study into the deepest fish populations in the world.

While most snailfish live in shallow water, others survive at some of the ‘greatest depths ever recorded’, Jamieson explained.

Don't expect the snailfish to win any prizes at a beauty contest. Credit: University of Western Australia
Don’t expect the snailfish to win any prizes at a beauty contest. Credit: University of Western Australia

The scientists used three ‘landers’ – automatic sea robots fitted with high-resolution cameras – during the two-month survey last year.

The bots were dropped into the Japan, Izu-Ogasawara and Ryukyu trenches at varying depths.

It was in the footage from the Izu-Ogasawara trench that the deepest snailfish was seen hovering serenely alongside crustaceans on the seabed.

Jamieson classified the fish as a youngster, explaining that the juveniles often stay as deep as possible to avoid being eaten by bigger predators in shallower water.

Another fascinating clip shot between 7,500 and 8,200 meters below sea level in the same trench showed a shoal of fish and crustaceans quite literally taking the bait and chowing down on food tied to the undersea robot.

Images of the two captured snailfish provide a rare glimpse of how the unique features of the deep-sea species help it survive in the extreme and often harsh environment.

The deepest fish ever captured. Credit: University of Western Australia
The deepest fish ever captured. Credit: University of Western Australia

With tiny eyes and translucent body, they also have no swim bladder, which helps other fish float, because this helps their in their deep-sea environment, Jamieson told CNN.

The professor explained that the warm southern current of the Pacific Ocean encourages lots of activity and pushes sea creatures to go deeper, providing a good source of food for bottom-feeding marine life.

While scientists hope to do more research into the depths and the creatures living there, it’s expensive work, Jamieson explained.

In fact, each bot costs $200k to assemble and operate.

“The challenges are that technology has been expensive and scientists don’t have a lot of money,” he lamented.

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